Lameness and Poor Performance

POOR PERFORMANCE

It is important to recognise and accurately diagnose a cause of lameness, to guide prognosis and develop an appropriate treatment plan. A preliminary investigation can be performed at your yard if you have appropriate facilities to examine the animal and undertake dynamic assessment if it is indicated.

If you would prefer, our clinic offers the optimal environment to comprehensively evaluate a lameness safely and undertake a sequential lameness investigation which may include diagnostic analgesia (nerve and joint blocks) to identify the region(s) of anatomy attributed to the lameness.

Once a region is identified, diagnostic imaging can be undertaken (xray and/or ultrasound) to definitively diagnose a condition. In the event that advanced imaging modalities are required, referral for MRI or CT can be arranged.

Depending on the diagnosis, it is our aim to offer same day (or next day treatment) where possible so that our patients can rehabilitate promptly.

Investigating and establishing the source of sub-optimal performance is a particularly important part of veterinary sports medicine. Our vets have a particular interest in sports medicine. Amongst the vets there is a wealth of experience working with thoroughbreds and the British Horseracing Authority, in addition to an accredited FEI Permitted Treating Vet with representation at major 5* events.

Thornton Wright is committed to ensuring that our competitive patients are in the best medical position possible to fulfil their athletic potential.

ORTHOPAEDIC TREATMENTS

Thornton Wright offers a diverse range of treatments for orthopaedic conditions.

Our veterinary surgeons will discuss the relevant options for a particular patient and offer advice regarding an appropriate rehabilitation plan.

Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ECWT)

Shockwave is thought to provide therapeutic benefit by improving the blood supply to an area, thus maximising healing of the treated area. Shockwave also hyperstimulates nerves associated with the affected anatomy and subsequently, is thought to down regulate the pain response. Shockwave requires the interference of a soft tissue – bone interface, and so is commonly utilised in treatment plans involving ligamentous conditions.

ESWT is drug free and so does not have a drug withdrawal for competition.

Corticosteroids

Corticosteroids belong to a potent group of anti-inflammatory medications and is a synthetic version of the naturally occurring ‘cortisol’. In equine practice, methylprednisolone acetate and triamcinolone acetate are commonly used with impressive efficacy.

It is important to be aware of the potential risks associated with corticosteroid treatment: these risks include infection and laminitis. Whilst these risks are low these complications can arise. Should you have any concerns regarding a treatment option, please discuss these directly with your veterinary surgeon.

Corticosteroids do have a drug withdrawal period and should be used as advised in competition.

Polyacrylamide Gel

This treatment targets hydration of a joint using hydrogel, and consequently results in the resemblance of a healthy, more lubricated joint capsule. This treatment is considered to have lasting benefit and offers support for compromised joints, often in cases debilitated by osteoarthritis.

These products do not have a drug withdrawal period for competition.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)

PRP can be used for the treatment of joints, synovial structures and soft tissue injuries and is a potent source of growth factors, which are involved in the development of the repair process. As with many regenerative therapies the evidence behind its use is limited but it does not appear to have any deleterious effects.

PRP is drug free and so does not have a drug withdrawal for competition.

Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Protein (IRAP)

IRAP is a natural treatment for joint disease, muscle injuries and soft tissue injuries. IRAP is made by the animals own white blood cells to reduce inflammation. As a treatment, blood is collected and cultured with specific glass beads which amplify IRAP production. Once IRAP is of a desired concentration it is harvested and administered into the affected joint or injury region.

IRAP is drug free and so does not have a drug withdrawal for competition.

Stem Cells Therapy

Stem cells often have the ability to become almost any cell type in the body and usually considered the gold standard treatment option for many joint and soft tissue injuries.

These cells can be:

  • autologous, meaning they are harvested from the animal (usually derived from a bone marrow sample taken from the horse and developed in a laboratory)
  • allogenic, meaning that they are harvested from a another animal (usually derived from a blood product of another horse, and prepared commercially)

These cells are then prepared and implanted, often injected under ultrasound guidance by one of our experienced veterinary surgeons.

Stem cell therapy is drug free and so does not have a drug withdrawal for competition.

POOR PERFORMANCE

It is important to recognise and accurately diagnose a cause of lameness, to guide prognosis and develop an appropriate treatment plan. A preliminary investigation can be performed at your yard if you have appropriate facilities to examine the animal and undertake dynamic assessment if it is indicated.

If you would prefer, our clinic offers the optimal environment to comprehensively evaluate a lameness safely and undertake a sequential lameness investigation which may include diagnostic analgesia (nerve and joint blocks) to identify the region(s) of anatomy attributed to the lameness.

Once a region is identified, diagnostic imaging can be undertaken (xray and/or ultrasound) to definitively diagnose a condition. In the event that advanced imaging modalities are required, referral for MRI or CT can be arranged.

Depending on the diagnosis, it is our aim to offer same day (or next day treatment) where possible so that our patients can rehabilitate promptly.

Investigating and establishing the source of sub-optimal performance is a particularly important part of veterinary sports medicine. Our vets have a particular interest in sports medicine. Amongst the vets there is a wealth of experience working with thoroughbreds and the British Horseracing Authority, in addition to an accredited FEI Permitted Treating Vet with representation at major 5* events.

Thornton Wright is committed to ensuring that our competitive patients are in the best medical position possible to fulfil their athletic potential.

ORTHOPAEDIC TREATMENTS

Thornton Wright offers a diverse range of treatments for orthopaedic conditions.

Our veterinary surgeons will discuss the relevant options for a particular patient and offer advice regarding an appropriate rehabilitation plan.

Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ECWT)

Shockwave is thought to provide therapeutic benefit by improving the blood supply to an area, thus maximising healing of the treated area. Shockwave also hyperstimulates nerves associated with the affected anatomy and subsequently, is thought to down regulate the pain response. Shockwave requires the interference of a soft tissue – bone interface, and so is commonly utilised in treatment plans involving ligamentous conditions.

ESWT is drug free and so does not have a drug withdrawal for competition.

Corticosteroids

Corticosteroids belong to a potent group of anti-inflammatory medications and is a synthetic version of the naturally occurring ‘cortisol’. In equine practice, methylprednisolone acetate and triamcinolone acetate are commonly used with impressive efficacy.

It is important to be aware of the potential risks associated with corticosteroid treatment: these risks include infection and laminitis. Whilst these risks are low these complications can arise. Should you have any concerns regarding a treatment option, please discuss these directly with your veterinary surgeon.

Corticosteroids do have a drug withdrawal period and should be used as advised in competition.

Polyacrylamide Gel

This treatment targets hydration of a joint using hydrogel, and consequently results in the resemblance of a healthy, more lubricated joint capsule. This treatment is considered to have lasting benefit and offers support for compromised joints, often in cases debilitated by osteoarthritis.

These products do not have a drug withdrawal period for competition.

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP)

PRP can be used for the treatment of joints, synovial structures and soft tissue injuries and is a potent source of growth factors, which are involved in the development of the repair process. As with many regenerative therapies the evidence behind its use is limited but it does not appear to have any deleterious effects.

PRP is drug free and so does not have a drug withdrawal for competition.

Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Protein (IRAP)

IRAP is a natural treatment for joint disease, muscle injuries and soft tissue injuries. IRAP is made by the animals own white blood cells to reduce inflammation. As a treatment, blood is collected and cultured with specific glass beads which amplify IRAP production. Once IRAP is of a desired concentration it is harvested and administered into the affected joint or injury region.

IRAP is drug free and so does not have a drug withdrawal for competition.

Stem Cells Therapy

Stem cells often have the ability to become almost any cell type in the body and usually considered the gold standard treatment option for many joint and soft tissue injuries.

These cells can be:

  • autologous, meaning they are harvested from the animal (usually derived from a bone marrow sample taken from the horse and developed in a laboratory)
  • allogenic, meaning that they are harvested from a another animal (usually derived from a blood product of another horse, and prepared commercially)

These cells are then prepared and implanted, often injected under ultrasound guidance by one of our experienced veterinary surgeons.

Stem cell therapy is drug free and so does not have a drug withdrawal for competition.

Experienced equine clinicians
available for emergency care 24/7
Call us on 01652 240 071

Normal office hours: Monday – Friday 8.30am – 5pm

Experienced equine clinicians

available for emergency care 24/7

Call us on
01652 240 071

Normal office hours:
Monday – Friday 8.30am – 5pm